The $300,000 Gold Plated Nintendo Wii Make for Queen Elizabeth II

There are some rather unusual items that can be found out there. One excellent example would be the gold-plated Nintendo Wii that can now be purchased by interested individuals for $300,000. As for why anyone would make such a thing, well, suffice to say that THQ thought that it was a good idea to present it to Queen Elizabeth II for the purpose of promoting one of its products. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the gold-plated Nintendo Wii never made it into the hands of its intended recipient. Instead, it was turned down by Queen Elizabeth II’s staff.

Why Was the Gold-Plated Nintendo Wii Turned Down By Queen Elizabeth II’s Staff?

The public has limited insight into the British royal family’s decision-making process. However, it seems reasonable to speculate that the gold-plated Nintendo Wii was turned down because of PR considerations. For those who are unfamiliar, the British royal family takes its PR very seriously. This makes sense because it has a keen awareness that royal families are not sacrosanct. After all, James II and VII was replaced by his daughter Mary II and her husband William III of Orange in 1688 with the assistance of much of the British ruling class because he crossed their red line. Furthermore, when both Mary II and her sister Anne died without surviving issue, it was the English Parliament that chose their second cousin George I of Hanover to succeed them over closer relations. On top of this, it is worth mentioning that the House of Windsor wasn’t always called the House of Windsor. Instead, it was once called the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha because of its descent from Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. Something that became very inconvenient when anti-German sentiment grew strong in Great Britain because of the First World War, thus resulting in the name change as well as other measures meant to bolster public support.

Nowadays, the British royal family is in a much more secure position than it was in the first half of the 20th century. However, that doesn’t mean that it has decided to slack off in this regard. Accepting the gold-plated Nintendo Wii would’ve damaged the British royal family’s image in exchange for no real gain, which is presumably why Queen Elizabeth II’s staff turned it down on her behalf.

What Was THQ?

Some people might recognize the name of THQ. After all, it was once one of the better-known video game companies that could be found out there. However, while there is still a video game company called THQ Nordic, it is important to note that this is a separate video game company that has since acquired the right to use the name. In short, THQ was started up in the 1990s. Its initial field of focus was toys, as shown by how THQ stands for Toy Headquarters. However, it wasn’t too long before THQ dropped toys in preference for concentrating 100 percent of its resources on video games. Over the course of two decades, it became one of the biggest names in the video game industry, so much so that it was making $1 billion in annual revenue. Something that put it at around the same level as their rival Activision. Unfortunately, THQ started to struggle in the late 2000s and early 2010s, with the result that it declared bankruptcy in December of 2012 with the intent of being sold intact to Clearlake Capital Group. A judge denied this plan. As a result, THQ was broken up. The THQ trademark went to the Austrian video game company called Nordic Games in 2014. After which, Nordic Games renamed itself THQ Nordic in 2016 to create a stronger connection between the two.

Why Did THQ Collapse When It Did?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the collapse of THQ was a much-discussed topic at the time. Thanks to that, interested individuals have a good idea of what happened as well as why it happened. For starters, the collapse of THQ wasn’t caused by the Great Recession. Certainly, said event didn’t help. After all, the Great Recession reduced consumers’ disposable income, which in turn, reduced the revenues of THQ as well as other video game companies. However, while its competitors eventually recovered, THQ never did. Instead, it worsened and worsened until it was forced to declare bankruptcy. The main cause for the collapse of THQ seems to have been a change in the market that gutted its primary source of revenue. THQ was once the leading publisher of licensed games aimed at a younger audience. For a time, this was very profitable because said products had very receptive markets. However, everything changed when mobile gaming became popular because it wasn’t too long before licensed mobile games devoured the market share of their console and PC-bound counterparts. Thanks to this, THQ’s licensed games became less and less profitable. Even worse, it was locked into its contracts, meaning that it had to continue making these products and continue paying for the licenses of these products even when it was eating losses for every single one of them.

Naturally, THQ saw the need to change. It didn’t want to start making licensed mobile games, particularly since it didn’t have any of the expertise and experience needed to make licensed mobile games. Instead, THQ decided to put more focus on its own properties. Unfortunately, it botched the implementation of this plan, which resulted in a wide range of serious issues. For example, THQ leadership was used to releasing products when their release dates had come rather than when they had been fully-polished. Thanks to this, the company released a number of games that could have been good or even great because weren’t because of a lack of time. Similarly, the shifting of resources caused serious resentment between the segment responsible for licensed games and the segment responsible for non-licensed games, which didn’t do wonders for internal cohesion. Eventually, the deathblow came when THQ leadership decided to release a second generation of the uDraw tablet, which was opposed by important figures within the company itself. The first generation of the tablet had been released for the Nintendo Wii to considerable success. However, the second generation of the tablet was released for the PS3 and the Xbox 360 to a much poorer reception, which was wholly unsurprising because there was neither an audience for it nor an app to attract an audience for it. THQ leadership made an attempt to save the company by selling it intact for a much reduced sum that wouldn’t cover what it owed, but it didn’t even announce to the public that the company was available for sale. Due to that, a judge ruled that the sale wouldn’t be in the best interests of the creditors, thus resulting in its dismantling.

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