How Much Do Dentures Cost?

There are few parts of the body prone to as much grief as our teeth. From that inaugural encounter with the Tooth Fairy to the very first drilling or filling, our mouth can feel like a strange and alien environment. And the older we get, the more care they require.

In fact, one of the biggest surprises for people who reach sixty and beyond is just how much time gets dedicated to tooth care. Dentures, far from being an escape from oral woes, can quickly become a chore if managed incorrectly. It’s why high quality denture care always begins with selecting the right product and the right denture cost.

Let’s take a closer look at the options and how much each type of denture is likely to cost:

Getting to Grips with the Options

The first thing to know is contemporary dentures are manufactured as plates. There is a bottom plate and a top plate. You’re not obliged to pay for a full set (with both plates) if only one half of your mouth is missing teeth. Plates are sold separately when needed. It’s important to note that buying one plate is not the same as investing in a partial denture.

The Full Denture

There are three options when considering denture type and denture cost. The first is a full denture which provides one or two plates containing a full set of teeth. The average cost for a full two plate denture is anywhere between $600 and $10,000. For a single plate, expect to pay between $300 and $5,000.

The Partial Denture

The second option is a partial denture. It’s the most common type of denture worn by seniors in the United States today. As it’s increasingly rare for a person to lose all their teeth – particularly with dental care advancing in quality all the time – it’s rare for somebody to need a full set of substitute teeth.

It’s more likely for a person to need a grouping of replacement teeth or singular teeth in different areas on the same plate. The average cost of a partial denture – for a person missing teeth in just one half of their mouth – is between $300 and $5,000. However, if you’re missing individual teeth on the top and bottom plates, expect to pay between $600 and $10,000.

The Implant Supported Denture

The most expensive type of denture is not the full denture, as many might expect. There is a third option, a more intensive and invasive choice. In many ways, implant supported dentures have more in common with traditional dentistry. In fact, they use surgical reconstruction techniques instead of standard denture technology.

Implant supported dentures are not separate from the mouth like traditional dentures. They are surgically implanted into the gums and do not require removal and care throughout the day. For this reason, a two plate set can cost anywhere between $7,000 and $90,000. For just the one plate of implants, the average cost is between $3,500 and $30,000.

The biggest benefit of implant supported dentures is that they require so little care. In most instances, wearers are able to treat them as they would regular teeth. They do not need to manually remove, reattach or clean them. The major downside – besides the hefty cost – is that the fitting process involves extensive oral surgery.

Implant supported dentures are not separate from the mouth like traditional dentures. They are surgically implanted into the gums and do not require removal and care throughout the day. For this reason, a two plate set can cost anywhere between $7,000 and $90,000. For just the one plate of implants, the average cost is between $3,500 and $30,000.

The biggest benefit of implant supported dentures is that they require so little care. In most instances, wearers are able to treat them as they would regular teeth. They do not need to manually remove, reattach or clean them. The major downside – besides the hefty cost – is that the fitting process involves extensive oral surgery. ers are able to treat them as they would regular teeth. They do not need to manually remove, reattach or clean them. The major downside – besides the hefty cost – is that the fitting process involves extensive oral surgery.

Implant supported dentures are not separate from the mouth like traditional dentures. They are surgically implanted into the gums and do not require removal and care throughout the day. For this reason, a two plate set can cost anywhere between $7,000 and $90,000. For just the one plate of implants, the average cost is between $3,500 and $30,000.

The biggest benefit of implant supported dentures is that they require so little care. In most instances, wearers are able to treat them as they would regular teeth. They do not need to manually remove, reattach or clean them. The major downside – besides the hefty cost – is the fitting process.


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