The Scientifically Proven Beneficial Effects of Quitting Facebook

There are a lot of people out there who spend a lot of time on Facebook and other social media sites. Unsurprisingly, such habits have a huge impact on them, meaning that they should give some serious thought to whether they should be spending so much time on social media or not. This is particularly true because scientists have carried out a number of studies proving that there are real benefits to be had from quitting Facebook, which is pretty concerning to say the least. Here are 5 examples of benefits of quitting Facebook that have been proven by scientific research:

1. More Free Time

First and foremost, quitting Facebook means freeing up time that could be spent elsewhere. The exact amount of time that will be freed up can see significant variations from one person to the next. However, Facebook’s own leadership has revealed in February of 2018 that average daily users spent about 41 minutes per day while average monthly users spent about 27 minutes per day on Facebook. For comparison, the average person spends about 1 hour and 8 minutes eating and drinking on weekdays, which sees a moderate increase to 1 hour and 17 minutes on weekends. Something that speaks volumes about just how much time Facebook users spend on Facebook.

2. Time Spent on Healthier Pursuits

When people quit Facebook, they can wind up using the freed-up time in various ways. For example, it is perfectly possible that some people will just use the freed-up time to watch more TV, which isn’t exactly an improvement. However, there are also plenty of other people who will use it to get in some exercise as well as spend more time with their friends and family members. The latter is particularly important because the evidence makes it very clear that Facebook friends are not necessarily the same as real life friends because apparently, face-to-face contact plays a very important role in helping us create and maintain social bonds with other people.

3. Lower Chances of Getting Depressed

Facebook use has been connected to increased chances of someone getting depressed for some time. As it turns out, the exact nature of the connection isn’t particularly surprising. In short, Facebook provides plenty of opportunities for Facebook users to make comparisons between their own lives and the lives of other people, which has been recognized as a source of unhappiness for a very long time. However, what is particularly dangerous about Facebook use is that it can encourage something of a vicious cycle because people who feel jealous will seek to promote themselves that much more, which in turn, can cause other people to feel jealous and thus respond in turn. Due to this, quitting Facebook might be the best way for people to remove themselves from such vicious cycles.

4. Fewer Opportunities for Negative Characteristics to Come to the Fore

On a related note, while it remains to be examined whether Facebook can instill certain negative characteristics into Facebook users, there is certainly reason that it can bring those negative characteristics to the forefront of things. This can be seen in how one study showed that people who spent more time posting about their own achievements were more narcissistic in personality while people who spent more time seeking out Facebook friends had lower self-esteem. Unfortunately, Facebook users does nothing to help those issues but instead feeds them, thus ensuring that they will continue to dominate. Something that is not beneficial for those particular Facebook users to say the least.

5. Less Obsessed with Politics

It is definitely a good thing for people to pay attention to politics, particularly since politics can have such a huge impact on their lives as well as the lives of everyone around them. However, there comes a point when people spend too much time on politics, which can cause them stress as well as other potential issues. With that said, it is curious to note that despite popular wisdom that social media sites have been causing political polarization, that particular sin is one that can’t be dropped at Facebook’s door because th evidence suggests that exposing people to a wider range of sources doesn’t actually help in that regard but could even cause them to become more rather than less polarized.


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