10 Benefits of Having a Wyndham Credit Card

Chances are you have driven by at least one Wyndham hotel property during your travels across the country or around the world. A hotel credit card that has a limited number of properties also has a limited value. While every credit card has its advantages, the Wyndham Credit Card has some features that will benefit you, especially if you are a frequent traveler.

1. Flat redemption rate for points

Because the Wyndham card lets you use you rewards points at any Wyndham hotel, this can mean significant savings if you stay in an expensive city or want to book a room in a luxury hotel. It’s the case where simplicity works to the advantage of the cardholder. The points rate per room is a flat 15,000. What if you are staying in a lower cost hotel? The advice is to use only a portion of your points, 3000 are allowed as the portion, and save the rest for the best.

2. You open the door to maximum hotel benefits.

If you’re traveling in any of the 72 countries where Wyndham has properties, you can use your card. The total number of properties is just over 7800, so if you are a frequent traveler you are likely to be able to use the card, and add up those points, in most places you travel to.

3. The Wyndham list of hotels has something for everyone.

Wyndham owns some of the most familiar brands in the industry, including:

  • Wingate
  • Hawthorn
  • Microtel
  • Ramada (Ramada Inn)
  • Days Inn
  • Super 8
  • Howard Johnson (affectionately known as HoJo’s)
  • Travelodge

4. It’s just not for hotels and room service.

You can use it for purchasing groceries, gassing up your car, or even use it to pay utility bills. Wyndham also partners with a select group of airlines, so you can use your points to lower your out of pocket costs when flying. This kind of flexibility is great to have in your wallet.

5. Free of blackout dates.

Though this only applies when you pay for a room using only your points, this adds to the card’s appeal. You get 15,000 points on signup and you can go from there to strategically plan your stays and never worry about blackout dates.

6. No annual fee.

Anyone who has to pay an annual fee for a credit card knows that it immediately reduces the value of a rewards program. An annual fee of $72 will cost you an average of $6 a month before you can think about coming out ahead. With the Wyndham Credit Card you can use it worry-free of that end of year statement requiring you to pony up the annual fee.

7. Tiered rewards points.

Many credit cards offer a flat “1 point for every $1 spent” rewards rate, which is not the best benefit for travelers who frequently stay in hotels. Not only does Wyndham want you to stay at their hotels, they want to reward you for taking care of daily business. The current rewards card benefit is:

  • 10 points for every dollar spent at a Wyndham hotel
  • 2 points for every dollar spent on gas, groceries, or even that utility bill
  • 1 point for every dollar spent on everything else

8. Preferred room and late checkout options.

Travelers know that sometimes getting the best room is largely a matter of chance if you just walk in and ask for a room. The Wyndham card lets you walk into the room of your choice without worrying about getting stuck in the high traffic areas of the hotel. For the times when life doesn’t cooperate with your schedule, you can also ask for the late checkout.

9. Heavy travelers will get the greatest benefit from the card.

Some reviewers criticize the card for its point redemption policy being limited to 4 years from the date you make a purchase. But the reason the Wyndham card is unique is because it is not for everyone. Besides, with the vast network of hotels to stay in it’s hard to imagine when you would not find a Wyndham brand hotel to stay in.

10. A Gold Membership Program.

All you have to do is to stay at a Wyndham brand hotel for 5 nights and meet the program’s qualifications to entry and you will add even more perks to your card’s list, including rollover nights that never expire.



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