A Closer Look a the Girard Perregaux Quasar

Girard-Perregaux has a way with watches and they’ve taken their innovative spirit to new heights with a design that is so unique that their latest creation is without a doubt one of the most unique examples of fine watchmaking and uniqueness we’ve seen. Their integration of high tech is melded with the creative genius of the brand’s Three Bridges movement and a sapphire case that has culminated in the creation of the Girard-Perregaux Quasar, a watch that offers the ultimate display of the Three Golden ridges movement for which they are famous. At first glance on the wrist, it appears to be more a proud display of the mechanical inner workings than it does a traditional time piece. It’s deserving of a closer look and investigation.

The case is simply crafted of sapphire crystal. It measures 45 mm in diameter with a thickness of 15.25 mm. It’s perfectly clear and presents the movement within as a device that is suspended on the wrist and floating in time. The clarity of the sapphire provides all onlookers with a sharp and multi-angle view of the movement from all angles including the back. It is worth noting here that the case for the watch takes more than 200 hours to create. The sapphire is machined into the shape that serves as the housing for the movement.

The dial

There is no dial to speak of so we focus on the hour and minute hands which are set atop the movement just below the capping sapphire crystal with an ever so slight beveling of the edges. You see a totally skeletonized version of the watch from front and back. Interestingly, there are no applied hours, minutes or seconds indexes on the watch so you must rely on the positioning of the scissor like hands and assume the correct time from their positioning. Lume has been applied to the hands to give them high visibility in low light conditions. When it comes to legibility, there is a total exposure of the movement and aside from the hands that tell the time, there is little to discern other than the admirably beautiful movement below.

The movement

The movement is the focal point of the Girard-Perregaux Quasar. The power behind the timepiece is a Caliber GP09400-1035. It measures 36 mm in diameter and 9.54 mm in thickness. Its functions are hours, minutes, small seconds and tourbillon. The movement is an automatic type that beats at a frequency of 3 Hz at 21,6000 vph with 27 jewels and a total of 260 components. The power reserve is 60 hours and it is water resistant up to 30 meters.

The strap

The Girard-Perregaux Quasar affixes to the wrist with a strap that is made of genuine alligator leather in Black with a triple folding clasp closure made of titanium.

The aesthetics in review

The glory of the Quasar is seen in the Three Golden Bridges movement which has been in use with the Neo Tourbillon since last year. This watch has a movement that is based upon the 19th century principle of the three bridges yet in an updated form that has only been used by the company for a year. The application of the matte black coloring adds a bit of contrast against the other components of the watch. I’s a totally open worked rendering that can be difficult to read and you must be keenly aware of the positioning if you want to tell the time with any degree of accuracy. While this watch may not be everybody’s cup of tea it is certain to find a good sized audience.

Pricing and availability

The Girard-Perregaux Quasar is scheduled to arrive for sale to the general public in March of 2019. The retail price has been set at $194,000 per watch. We’ve not yet heard about how many examples of the watch are planned to be offered so it’s unclear whether this will be a limited edition or a regular run. We’ve also not heard about the boxing or packaging or if there are plans to include additional straps with the watch. It’s going to be expensive, but the brand is known for providing the ultimate in quality in workmanship, design and materials.


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