20 Must-See Mountains in Montana

Mountains

Montana is a state with opportunities to get outdoors and participate in activities that connect us more closely with the natural environment. Montana’s mountains are best for simply taking in the exquisite view they create, while some of them are ideal for trekking and climbing. Montana is a name of Spanish origin. It’s translated as Mountains. It offers a spectrum of mountains of varying elevations and climbing difficulties. There’s something for everyone, but all the mountains on our list are breathtaking. Here are twenty must-see mountains in Montana to visit when you’re in the area.

20. Mad Wolf Mountain Glacier National Park, Glacier Country

Vacation Idea recommends visiting Mad Wolf Mountain. Mad Wolf Mountain is in the Glacier National Park in Glacier country, not far from the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Its peak is at an elevation of 8,341 feet, drawing mountain climbers from across the country. The views from the summit are expansive and breathtaking. You can see the wildlife on distant lower peaks featuring bighorn sheep, mountain goats, bears, and deer. Non-tribal members must obtain a Blackfoot Recreation Permit if accessing the area from the reservation. The entrance is through a network of gravel roads on the Blackfoot reservation to Cut Bank Ridge or use the trailhead hear Cut Bank Campground.

19. Tinkham Mountain Glacier National Park, Glacier County

Tinkham Mountain is a peak in Montana with an elevation of 8,442 feet above sea level. Hikers may navigate the trails without a guide or reserve a guided trip. The most popular hiking trail that leads to the summit begins at the Two Medicine Campground. A round trip from the campground to the top is 21 miles. Most parts of the trail are easy to traverse for those who are physically fit until you start up the last mile to the summit. The last mile requires mountain climbing skills. The gain of 3,279 feet makes travel difficult through the Goat Trail that leads to the top. You encounter exposed cliffs and move through two passes, Cut Bank and Pitamakan. The views are spectacular from the summit.

18. Gash Point Victor, Montana

Gash Point is a mountain peak in the Bitterroot Mountains not far from Victor, Montana. The elevation is 6,866 feet. The peak is best for taking in the views and enjoying the scenery. It is possible to climb the mountain, but it’s off the beaten path and not one of the more popular choices for climbing. There is no maintained trail to the summit, which makes it harder to climb. Gash Point is named after Jim Gash, a former resident of the area, in the 1870s. There is a designated wilderness area beneath the mountain. Visitors are asked to read the rules and follow them to preserve the growth of trees and animals returning after a devastating fire that destroyed the area in 2006. The vegetation is growing back, and animals are returning to the area. It’s a beautiful mountain top view, and some trails are exceptional for hiking. Climbing to the summit requires mountaineering skills due to the lack of maintenance.

17. Mount Rearguard Carbon County, Montana

Mount Rearguard is a taller peak in the Beartooth Mountain Range in Carbon County. It is the highest peak on the Hellroaring Plateau. The trailhead leading to the summit is the Rock Creek trailhead. You can find multiple trails that offer routes to the summit. Many of the trails are ranked in order of difficulty. It makes the peak a good climb for climbers of all skill levels and abilities. The elevation at the summit is 12,204 feet. You’ll find plenty of places to camp for mountain climbers and those who enjoy taking short or long hikes. The National Forest campgrounds are well-maintained. It provides an excellent base for backpackers. The shores of Moon Lake and Shelf Lake are popular with campers.

16. Rocky Mountain Estes Park, Montana

Rocky Mountain is in the Sawtooth Range of the Rocky Mountains. The peak is at an elevation of 9,392 feet at the summit. It’s in the middle of the Bob Marshall Wilderness. Rocky Mountain is a favorite peak for climbers and hikers who appreciate its remote location and the natural beauty that surrounds the summit. Spectacular views of the surrounding landscape are available at the top. Most hikers don’t encounter many humans on the trek but there are reports of Grizzly bears in the area. You can access the summit from the trailhead for Headquarters Creek Pass in the Mill Falls Campground. It’s an excellent choice for hikers as a base camp.

15. Ajax Peak Wisdom, Montana/Salmon, Idaho

Ajax peak is a mountain that is in the middle of the Continental Divide in the north region of the Beaverhead Mountains. It’s not far from Wisdom, MT, and Salmon, ID. the peak towers over 10,000 feet in elevation. The mountain is the home of the Ajax Mine, located on its south basin side not far from the peak. Hikers can see the mine shaft after reaching some elevation. A road leads to the opening of the mine shaft where you will also find an old cabin not far from the lake. Evidence of fire remains in the charred trees that cover the lower slopes of the peak.

14. Crazy Peak Livingston, Montana

Peak Visor recommends visiting Crazy Peak. It’s the highest peak in the Crazy Mountains range, which is the third-largest range in the state. Crazy Peak’s summit is at 11,211 feet in elevation. Campers can enjoy setting up camp near Blue Lake, which also provides beautiful views of the peak. It’s a popular mountain for hiking, scrambling, and mountaineering. It’s accessible to the public in Spring, Summer, and Fall. It’s also a popular area for skiing in the winter.

13. Saddle Peak Bozeman, and Maudlow, Montana

Saddle Peak has an elevation of 1,522 feet at the summit. It’s closest to Bozeman and Maudlow, in Gallatin County in the Bridger Mountains. The subrange of the Rocky Mountains is in the southwestern part of Montana. The mountain range runs mostly from north to south and it’s located between Bozeman and Maudlow. A hike to the summit yields magnificent views of the Crazy6 Mountains and the Shields River Valley. You can also see views of Sacagawea peak. The Ridge Trail is the most popular path to the summit. It’s the eighth-highest peak of the 63 peaks in the Big Belt Mountains and the fourth highest in Gallatin County.

12. Baldy Mountain Bozeman, Montana

Baldy Mountain is a popular hiking destination. It’s a peak in the Bridger Mountain Range to the north of Bozeman. The elevation at the summit is 8,898 feet. It’s accessible from the main street in Bozeman, leading to North Rouse Avenue which turns to Highway 86, follow the road for 4 miles and turn to the left on the M trailhead with parking at the base of the College M Trail. Follow the trail to Ridge Trail 513 and continue your hike to the summit. It’s not far from the Custer Gallatin National Forest Park.

11. Hardscrabble Peak Bozeman, Montana

Hardscrabble Peak is in the Bridger Mountain Range, not far from Bozeman, Montana. The peak is 9,577 feet in elevation. It’s the second-highest mountain peak in the Big Belt Mountains. Visitors may enjoy campsites along Fairy Lake’s north shore and the Fairy Lake Campground not far from the trailhead that leads to the summit of Hardscrabble Peak. It’s in the Bridger Mountain Range. It’s accessible via the Sacajawea trail. It takes you up to the pass. At the juncture, take the north part of the trail to reach Pomp Peak, but you need to keep climbing if you’re daring. The hardscrabble environment is a challenge to climb. The hiking trail upward represents some dangers.

10. Ross Peak Bozeman, Montana

Ross Peak is a popular place with mountaineers and hikers. The trail to the summit is best from April through September. It’s popular with backpackers, hikers, and birdwatchers. There are some exceptional places to camp for overnight or several-day camping experiences. The route to the summit generally takes 4.25 hours to complete. Prepare for an elevation gain of 535 feet, which can be challenging. The summit provides panoramic views of the surrounding landscape.

9. Sacagawea Peak Bozeman, Montana

Sacagawea Peak is a favorite mountain for hikers and anyone who wants to get away from the crowds and enjoy the beauty of the surrounding area. You can bring your dog if he is on a leash. The elevation at the summit is 9,654 feet. Sacagawea Peak Trail is moderate to difficult in its ranking. It has an elevation gain of 2,000 feet. The round trip is 4 miles and takes between 2 to 5 hours to navigate from start to finish. It’s an out and back trail that offers scenic views of the forest, lake, wildlife, and wildflowers.

8. Lone Mountain Big Sky, Montana

Lone Mountain is in the Madison Mountain Range. The summit of the peak is 11.167 feet high, and in the middle of the Lee Metcalf Wilderness, also within the Beaverhead-Deerlodge and Gallatin National Forests. Beautiful views of Kock Peak can be seen from the summit with 360-degree views. the Big Sky Resort occupies the southern, northern, and eastern slopes of Lone Peak. It’s also a popular place for skiers in the winter.

7. Mount Sentinel Missoula, Montana

Mount Sentinel is a popular peak for backpackers and hikers with an elevation of 5,158 feet at the summit. It’s known by its large M letter, created from concrete on the hillside. Its nickname is Mount Woody. It’s a small peak not far from the University of Montana in Missoula. It’s in the Sapphire Mountains. The out-and-back hiking trail to the summit is 3.1 miles and it provides day hikers with a vigorous workout with an easy-to-navigate trail.

6. Divide Mountain Saint Mary, Montana

The Top Tours suggests visiting Divide Mountain. It’s one of the most scenic places in Glacier National Park. It’s in the Lewis Range on the northeast border of the GNP. It’s popular for its hiking trails that are easy enough for beginners. The summit provides gorgeous views of St Mary, Yellow Mountain, and other peaks in the Rocky Mountains. The elevation is 8,670 feet. The views of the wildflowers and grasses are also spectacular from April through June.

5. Rising Wolf Mountain Birney, Montana

Rising Wolf Mountain is in the Lewis Range of the Glacier National Park. It’s visible from the Two Medicines Area. The elevation is 9,518 feet at the summit. It’s a mountain that is the most popular with seasoned mountaineers and it’s not recommended for novice hikers. The elevation of Rising Wolf Mountain is 9,518 feet with difficult conditions considered challenging when hiking to the summit. Upon arrival, hikers enjoy spectacular views of the valleys and hanging lakes. Be prepared for cold weather year-round.

4. Mount Grinnell Columbia Falls, Montana

Mount Grinnell is one of the most beautiful mountains in Montana. The views are breathtaking from the summit. It’s a moderately difficult climb to reach the top of the 7,604 peaks. Although it’s not among the highest peaks, the trail that leads to the summit is just short of ten miles with an elevation gain from the trailhead of 4,550 feet. It requires stamina to navigate the multiple ups and downs which stretch the distance out another three miles. Hikers should beware of the grizzly bears, black bears, and mountain lions that live on the mountain.

3. Sinopah Mountain Columbia Falls, Montana

Sinopah Mountain is at an elevation of 8,276 feet above sea level. It’s one of the most popular peaks in the Two Medicine region. Hikers enjoy beautiful views of Two Medicine Lake and the surrounding landscape of mountains and trees. The trail to the summit is easy enough for beginners. Multiple trails lead in the direction of the summit. Hikers may also cut back on the distance by crossing the lake on a ferry to enjoy a ride and seeing the views from a lower elevation.

2. Mount Aeneas, Jewel Basin Hiking Area, Flathead National Forest Kalispell, Montana

Planetware recommends including Mount Aeneas on your tour of the best mountains in Montana. The peak rises into the sky to a level of 7,474 feet. One of the most popular access trails is in the Jewel Basin at the Camp Misery Trailhead. It’s at a high elevation and you can avail forest service roads to get there. You’ll find plenty of fishing spots in lakes and ponds that are stocked with fish. The basin offers more than 35 miles of hiking trails. Hiking to the summit of Mt. Aeneas has an elevation gain of 1,800 feet but the 360-degree views of the landscape are worth it. You may even see a few mountain goats. The trail is four to six miles one way, depending on the trail you take.

1. Trapper Peak Darby, Montana

Trapper Peak is in the Bitterroot Mountain Range that is split between the southwest part of Montana and the Idaho Panhandle near the Sapphire Mountains. Trapper Peak is 10,157 feet in elevation at the summit. It’s the tallest peak in the area, popular for its hiking trails. It’s not for novices or those who are not in the excellent physical condition as the trail climbs in elevation to 4,000 feet within the last four miles to the summit. The hiking trail is increasingly steep and challenging. Beautiful views of Baker and Gem Lakes make the trip worth the challenges.

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