How Many Different Types of Roller Coasters Are There?

Roller Coaster

Roller coasters are iconic rides that people of all ages enjoy and expect to see when they go to the Fair, carnivals, or amusement parks. Almost every theme park has a different kind of roller coaster. They’re not all the same, and some distinctions set them apart from one another. Have you ever wondered how many different types of roller coaster rides exist? Here are ten different types of roller coasters. Each is guaranteed to give you a thrill.

1. Inverted Roller Coaster

The Cold Wire lists the inverted roller coaster as a thrill ride that turns riders every which way. The seats attach to the underside of the roller coaster tracks. It leaves your legs hanging down for a greater feeling of freedom and a sensation of flying. This coaster turns riders upside down at various parts of the track. it’s not a ride to choose if you’re wearing flip-flops because you’re likely to lose them.

2. Suspended Roller Coaster

The suspended roller coaster is a lot like the inverted roller coaster but some characteristics distinguish them. A swinging arm pivots from one side to the other. Riders not only hang upside down, but the roller coaster train also moves up and down. there is a lot of movement in these cars so if you’re prone to motion sickness, it’s wise not to eat or drink anything before you get on the ride.

3. Pipeline Roller Coaster

The pipeline roller coaster features extreme thrills. Riders have the sensation that they are being shot down a pipe at high rates of speed. The car sits down in the middle of the tracks instead of above or below. It’s not for those with claustrophobia. It truly feels like you’re going through a pipe at warp speed. It also looks like a pipeline, which is where the design gets its name.

4. Wing Coaster

The wing roller coaster is another type that is easy to distinguish from the other types. It has two seats placed on either side of the track. The unique placement of the seats on either side of the track results in a lot more movement of the seats. They’re also placed on an axis so they can rotate and spin. As you can imagine, going down a railroad track in a seat that is spinning and pivoting could be quite a thrill. You’re firmly secured and restrained in the seat but it’s a sensation that could cause those with a weak stomach to have a few issues. This is another ride that calls for discretion. It’s for the adventurous thrill-seekers who love the sensation of movement.

5. Accelerator Roller Coaster

The Hobby Kraze explains the accelerator coaster gives you a rush that you won’t find on any other type of coaster. Its name describes how it operates to generate a thrill for riders. The coaster roars to the ideal speed quickly, shooting riders across the track like a bullet. Accelerator coasters reach high speeds quickly, moving at top speeds between 60 to 150 mph. They’re not for the faint of heart. Depending on the size of this type of coaster the heights range from 40 to 465 feet. Combine height and speed and it’s the thrill of a lifetime. This is a ride that may have quite a few restrictions. For example, if you have heart issues or some other physical ailments, it may not be suitable or safe. Yes. It’s that intense!

6. Bobsled Roller Coaster

The Bobsled Roller Coaster gets its name from the type of cars that are used to hold riders. They look like bobsleds and they follow along pipes. The cars are not attached to fixed tracks which allow the cars to slide along them for the sensation of riding in a bobsled across snowbanks. They’re not as thrilling as some of the high-speed rides, but they’re a lot of fun. Most bobsled coasters can be found at various parks throughout the United States.

7. Stand-Up Coaster

A Stand-up roller coaster is made of steel and is equipped with seats that are like bicycle seats, that riders stand against. Riders are secured in the ride by over-the=shoulder straps and restraints. Some of these coasters allow riders to choose between standing up or sitting down. they’re a lot like seated looping coasters. Most feature diving loops, inclined loops, and other thrilling twists and turns.

8. Flying Roller Coaster

Trek Baron explains the remaining types of roller coasters on our list. Each has features that set them apart from the others discussed earlier. The Flying roller coaster first appeared in the UK. Passengers climb up into the ride via a ladder. Riders assume a seated position but the seat reclines just before the ride takes off. It gives riders the sensation of flying as they’re lying on their backs and facing the sky.

9. Floorless Roller Coaster

The Floorless roller coaster is made of steel. it does not have a floor. Riders are secured in seats that allow their legs to dangle over the tracks. Most of these types of roller coasters take riders through a series of inversions. Floors are in place until all riders are secured. Just before the launch, the floors and gates are removed. Floors move back into their places when it’s time to disembark from the ride.

10. Dive Coaster

Dive coasters are so named because they take the riders on extreme vertical drops. They’re made of steel and provide thrills by taking riders to extreme heights and dropping them at high rates of speed. Some of them offer drops from up to 200 feet with various themes. You’ll find dive coasters at the Busch Gardens Williamsburg Amusement Park in Virginia, USA, and at the Tampa, Florida Sheikra coaster at Busch Gardens Africa.

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