The 10 Cheapest Places to Live in Virginia

Salem

Virginia might be one of the wealthiest states in the US but that doesn’t mean it’s off the table for anyone with a shoestring budget and a taste for frugality. Obviously, anyone who wants to save their cents would do best to avoid the area around Washington, DC, but Virginia is a vast, diverse state with a little something to suit every budget. Without further ado, here are the 10 cheapest places to live in Virginia.

Vinton

10. Vinton

If you want to live in close proximity to Roanoke but don’t want to pay a fortune for the privilege, the bedroom community of Vinton could be your ideal match. if you want to rent, expect to part with around $725 – in comparison to some of the other places on our list, it sounds relatively expensive, but it’s still several hundred dollars less than the national average. A single-family home, meanwhile, will cost you around $148,000. When you combine the low property prices with the respectable median income of $49,618, it’s easy to understand why Vinton is one of the cheapest places to live in Virginia.

Cave Spring

9. Cave Spring

if you want good amenities, plenty of opportunities for recreation, affordable housing, and some of the lowest living costs in Virginia, look no further than Cave Spring. Thanks to its superbly attractive prices, it ranks as the ninth cheapest place to live in Virginia.

Elliston

8. Elliston

If you like to live in the kind of place where there’s always something to do, don’t move to Elliston. The town is peaceful and beautiful but it’s also tiny, and that comes with consequences for those who like a varied nightlife and plenty of recreational opportunities. But if small-town living and small-town prices are up your street, it’s ideal. Despite a healthy median income of $58,374, the cost of property is immensely affordable, with a median home value of $130,100 and a median rental price of $528.

Gate City

7. Gate City

When people talk about Virginia being one of the most expensive states in the US, they obviously have stopped to consider Gate City. Named by Niche as the cheapest suburb in the state, Gate City is a small, friendly little town with a strong sense of community and charm to spare. The big city lights are noticeably absent, but if you prefer safety and security to thrills and spills, it’s ideal. It’s especially ideal if you’re sick of coming to the end of your paycheck two weeks into the month. With a median home price of just $96,400 and a median rent of just $488 per month, you’ll have no problem keeping on top of your bills if you live here.

Pulaski

6. Pulaski

Drive around an hour southwest of Roanoke and you’ll find Pulaski, a small town where the prices are almost as tiny as the population. If you’re tired of spending most of your income on rent or mortgage payments, this is the town for you – the median home price is a measly $117,600 and the average rent is an equally insubstantial $738. The median income might not be huge, but $49,655 will take you a lot further in Pulaski than it will most anywhere else.

Bluefield

5. Bluefield

Ranked by listwithclever.com as one of the cheapest places to live in Virginia, Bluefield certainly offers plenty of bang for your buck, with the average home costing a tiny $89,200. With a population of just 5,500, it’s by no means the biggest city in the world, but if you like small-town charm and small prices equally well, it’s perfect.

Richlands

4. Richlands

If you want a beer, a haircut or a movie ticket in Richlands, expect to pay around 2 percent less than you would in most parts of the US. 2 percent doesn’t sound like a lot, and it’s not. So, why is Richlands on our list? Because it’s got some of the cheapest property in Virginia. Whether you want to get your hands on a one-bedroom apartment or a four-bedroom family home, expect to pay a whopping 48 percent less than the national average. When you combine the property prices with the cost of goods and services, you’re looking at a cost of living that comes in at a very attractive 25 less than the state average.

Covington

3. Covington

If you’re looking to get your foot on the property ladder, you’ll find few cheaper places to do it in Virginia than Covington. According to Home Snacks, the town has the cheapest homes in the state – expect to pay just $72,900 for a very reasonably sized family home. If you’d rather keep your money in your landlord’s pocket for a little while longer, a rental property shouldn’t cost you much more than around $600 per month. In fairness, the median household income of $40,655 isn’t great, but when the cost of living is this low, you won’t notice the effect on your wallet.

Danville

2. Danville

Danville is a charming city located in south-central Virginia along the North Carolina border. Surrounded by beautiful countryside and offering plenty by way of history, culture, and recreation, it combines the charm of a small town with the attractions of a big city. If all of this sounds expensive, prepare for a pleasant surprise. Lovely though Danville is, it’s by no means some exclusive little enclave where you need a million in the bank to fit in. According to Area Vibes, it ranks as one of the cheapest places to live in Virginia. Housing is a full 47 percent lower than the national average, while goods and services will cost you 10 percent less here than they will in most other places.

Salem

1. Salem

Often, we tend to think of cheap as synonymous with undesirable. And there’s a certain truth to that… at least in most cases. Salem is an exception. Named by Only in Your State as one of the cheapest but still great places to live in Virginia, it ticks just about every box. The crime is low, the housing options are varied and affordable, the schools are excellent and the amenities are just as wonderful. The only thing it doesn’t have in abundance is big price tags. If you’re looking for a hometown that lets you scrimp on living costs without sacrificing on lifestyle, it’s a safe choice.

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