The History of the Chicago White Sox Logo

If you have ever had to make a presentation, you might have had to endure a headache as you tried to decide if to go all-caps or initial-caps for the title. That same headache was for the Chicago White Sox as they kept changing the style of the letters used. Below is the history behind the Chicago White Sox logo.

Chicago White Stockings logo

Chicago White Sox was established in 1901 and made their debut one year after moving to Chicago town. Consequently, they created their inaugural logo which was a simple “C” in red block style. They used this logo for the next two years. In 1903, they made some changes to their logo. The color changed from red to navy blue while the font of the letter “C” changed. This logo was their last to use as the Chicago White Stockings.

Chicago White Sox

Still, in 1993, the Chicago White Stockings changed to become Chicago White Sox, but the logo did not change much to represent the new name. Instead, all that changed was the color of “C” from navy blue to blue.

  • In 1904, the letter “C” remained, but its style changed such that it was more elongated than the previous one. At the center of the letter, there was a protruding triangle. As for the color, it remained unchanged.
  • In 1905, the Chicago White Sox changed their logo to a different letter “C.” Instead of the protruding triangle, the middle now had a white diamond that protruded on the back and the front of the letter. The bottom of the letter also changed to become more rounded.
  • From 1906 to 1907, the logo still retained the letter “C” but made a few changes. They opted to go for a more rounded letter, but at the top end of the letter, they added a hook while the bottom was cut off. The color still was blue.
  • Just like the previous version of the logo, the Chicago White Sox decided to use triangles protruding at the middle of the letter, both the back and front. While the slight hook on the top end of the letter remained, the bottom end changed due to a minor cutoff. This logo was in use from 1908 to 1909.
  • 1910 brought another change. The letter “C” became rounded, but the hook at the top end remained. They got rid of the cutoff at the bottom end. The color continued to be blue.

Changing from “C”

1912 saw the Chicago White Sox change from the use of letter “C” to using letter “S” which has become one of the most famous logos in baseball. The “S” is in Roman style font, and the top loop of the letter has a small “O” while at the bottom loop, a small” X” was placed. All these letters were in blue. They used this logo until 1916. In 1917, there was not much change to the previous logo because they maintained the letters. However, the styles of all letters changed, and the color remained to be blue.

Introducing new colors and design

1918 marked the introduction of a new design that involved a white sock placed inside a blue and gold globe, with the words “WORLD CHAMPIONS” circled it. Above the globe, there was an eagle with spread out wings with the years 1906 and 1917 on the right and left wing respectively. Behind the eagle, there was the American banner, and the globe rested on two crisscrossing bats with a baseball at the intersection of the crisscross. Below all this, there was a “Chicago” script. The Chicago White Sox used this logo until 1931.

In 1932, they decided to move away from the previous year’s design and opted for something simple. The White Sox, therefore, went for “SOX,” which was red with a blue outline and in a vertical, diagonal position. Inside the letter “O” there was the baseball and behind the word, they put a bat. They went back to the most famous logos in baseball in 1936 by having the letter “S,” with the small “O” and ” X” in the top and bottom loops respectively. They also went back to using blue.

Saying goodbye to the most famous logos in baseball

In 1939, the logo included a baseball player who was carrying a blue baseball bat with “WHITE SOX,” in white, on it. However, the logo used in the previous year was used on the player’s jersey but in red. Behind the player, there was a baseball seamed in red.

  • In 1949, they decided to use a sock with wings, depicting it flying through the air with wind and clouds. Across the front, almost in the middle the word “Chicago” was scripted in red and blue.
  • In 1960, a player was holding a transparent bat and a white sock. Both the sock and the player were set against a red circle background with the bat coming out of the circle.
  • From 1976 to 1986, the White Sox logo was that of “CHICAGO WHITE SOX” at the bottom. It was in red and had red lines separating “Chicago” from “White Sox.” On top of this wordmark was another one, “SOX” in blue and a cartoon baseball player facing right holding on a blue bat, with his hands depicted by a red circle.
  • In 1987, they did not change from the previous year’s so much since only the colors went a shade darker. They used this logo for the next four years, and in 1991, they changed.

Present day logo

The logo they came up with in 1991 has been in use until now. It is that of an old English wordmark “SOX,” in a diagonal position. The script is in white and black with a silver trim.


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