A Closer Look at The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB4 Daytona

A Closer Look at The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB4 Daytona

If you love classic cars, you must hold Ferrari sports cars with high esteem. The Ferrari 365 GTB/4 is just one among many classic Ferrari’s that still rock the road from the mid-90s. The Daytona has been hailed for its powerful acceleration and spectacular design. The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 was the first to be produced in the rage of Ferrari 365 GTB/4. Officially launched in 1968, the GTB/4 Ferrari’s were produced from 1967 all the way to 1971. Within this short period, the Daytona had gathered much public attention and was one among the most sought after Ferrari’s.

“Daytona” is an unofficial name given to Ferrari 365 GTB/4 in 1967 after clinching a 1-2-3 finish in the 1967 24 hours Daytona. The P3/4, 412P and 330 P4 machines took top spots in the coveted event that year, giving the Daytona much publicity. After being baptized Daytona, few people refer to it with its official name. However, even to date Ferrari itself does not recognize the name as an official one.

The Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Specifications

The design of the 1967 Daytona was very different from most of the other cars at the time. The Ferrari 365 GTB/4 had a front engine which was much different from the mid-engined Miura then. Ferrari also maintained the rear drive position for this car despite other brands changing. The car was running on a Tipo 251 engines which was developed from the Colombo V12. Although the V12 was a powerful engine a few twists were made to improve the acceleration. The 275 GTB/4 enjoyed a 60-degree bank angle with DOHC 2 valves on each cylinder. The Ferrari Daytona enjoyed a large capacity with each cylinder holding up to 4.4 litres (4390cc).

The Ferrari 365 GTB/4 also enjoyed a compression ratio of 9.3:1, producing well over 250 kW and a maximum torque of 431Nm. Car lovers are always on the lookout for performance and the Daytona does not disappoint. The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB4 is one of the few classics that has maintained performance to this age. This Ferrari’s masterpiece can still match most modern cars with its maximum speed of 174mph and an amazing acceleration of 0- 60 mph in just 5.4 seconds. Over the years, some modifications were made to the American version of the Ferrari 365 GTB/4. The compression ratio for the 1968 to 1971 versions was reduced to 8.8:1. The exhaust pipe was also modified with a centralized silencer for the purpose of alterations to primary pipes.

Being a 1960’s machine, you would guess right that it is a manual transmission car. The car enjoys 5 transmission gears with a four-wheel independent suspension. The powerful transmission has played a part in making this car both a track and road master. The Ferrari Daytona was initially developed for personal use. The Ferrari 365 GTB/4 racing version was first prepared in 1969. The Racing version enjoyed an aluminium body and improved functionality if the driving area. The car was intended to take part in the 24-hour Le Mans race but crashed in practice. It was until late 1970 that Ferrari produced an official racing car for this GTB class again.

Official Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Racing Versions

The official racing Ferrari 365 GTB/4 were built in batches of 5. The first five were produced between 1970 and 1971. The following 5 cars were produced in 1972 and the last batch in 1973. The trademark for all the racing versions was a light body, mainly made from aluminium and fiberglass panels. Such light material was used to reduce the weight of the car and give it an edge over other racing motors. The most important design specifications remained the same. The engine remained unchanged for the first batch of road and racing cars. On the second and third batches, the engine was boosted from a 298 kW to 336kW between 1972 and 1973. This change to the specifics of the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 still affects the pricing of the GTB cars up to date.

Racing and Success of The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB/4

The 1967 GTB was never raced by an official Ferrari team. However, they enjoyed success under individual entrants. In the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the GTB snatched the 5th position in 1971. In the preceding years (1972, 73 and 74), the GT took all the wins. To crown the success of the GTB, the Ferrari 365 GTB/4s class took all the first 5 positions in the 1972 Le Mans.
The GTB slowly faded away in the GT class giving room for other cars to succeed. However, the 1973 GTB enjoyed later success in 1979 in the 24 hours of Daytona.

Why Is The Daytona So Expensive?

A stop at Hemmings car listings, shows that Daytona listings start from as high as $700, 000. The high prices of the Daytona can be traced back to 1971 when one was driven by Dan Gurney in the first Cannonball Baker Memorial Trophy Dash. This event showcased the car’s ability to sustain high-speed travel, with the car winning the race at a speed of 80.1 miles per hour. The event saw the Daytona complete the distance between New York and LA in just 35 hours 54 minutes. Over the years, the Daytona has gained a reputation among classic car lovers due to its speed and sleek design. Even though the car has been around for many years, the few remaining cars still rule the world of classic cars. You can trust the Daytona to take you anywhere on the road. Although the car may be a bit old, it is still worth a fortune in local racing events and classic car shows.

Conclusion

The 1967 Ferrari 365 GTB4 is among the GT cars that will be remembered for a long time. It may not have enjoyed so much success on the road but it had its moments. The GTB4 is mainly remembered for the 1972 straight 5 first positions in the Le Mans . The Daytona is loved due to its powerful engine and flexible controls. With a manual 5 speed gearbox, the Daytona brings back the fun days of street racing. The Daytona might be somewhat expensive but it is worth the effort.


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