The Best and Worst Years for a Used Toyota Camry

The Toyota brand is extremely well-known and respected. The Toyota Camry is only one example of how the company’s innovations have revolutionized the automobile industry over the years. The Camry is well-known worldwide as a reliable, stylish, and reasonably priced sedan. The 2021 Toyota Camry is a competitively priced midsize car that comes standard with a wealth of safety features, an incredibly simple infotainment system, and quick steering for a comfortable ride.

It can easily fit five persons in its spacious cabin, which offers lots of headroom, legroom, and outstanding fuel economy. A completely remodeled exterior, more safety features, modernized systems, higher quality engine engines, and higher mileage on gas are some improvements to the most recent iteration.

The Camry

Apple CarPlay and Amazon Alexa are included in the list of standard features for the 2019 model. According to Motor Biscuit, the TRD variant made its debut in 2020, including Android Auto as standard equipment and an all-wheel drive option. Although the Toyota Camry typically has a very high dependability rating, there have been several recalls in recent years. However, most years of the model have been successful, receiving high marks for dependability and expanding the number of standard conveniences from eight to ten. However, there are certain model years of the Toyota Camry that you should stay away from because of recalls and other potential headaches. Here is a look at the Camry’s history and highlights the best and worst models.

What to Look For When Determining the Worst and Best Years of a Particular Vehicle

Use the Used Car Safety Rating and Car Safety Risk Management to determine whether you got your eye on the used Toyota Camry has been in any crash. You may buy with the assurance that you’re obtaining a safe vehicle and one that will shield you and your occupants from the worst repercussions of a traffic collision by looking into the safety score for the vehicle you’re contemplating. You should also contrast various sources where drivers and car owners file grievances. Look at the sources with the highest rating to avoid unreliable sources. Second, consider the advice of judicial bodies like the NHTSA. Finally, it is always good to know if the used car has been involved in any federal crimes over time.

Best Years for Toyota Camry

Before we go ahead and speak of the bad years for Toyota Camry, let’s look at some of the best years it possesses.

5. 2021 Toyota Camry

The debut of the 2021 Camry was met with much fanfare due to Toyota’s dedication to quality construction and sleek design. A lot is riding on the 2021 line, and it has the potential to survive a lot longer than 100k. According to Motor and Wheels (https://motorandwheels.com/best-worst-years-for-toyota-camry/), the brand returned to its drawing board to address significant flaws, as evidenced by the car’s better build quality and increased safety features. The 2021 Camry’s bold design and many standard safety features make it a leading choice. The new model year has discontinued the L trim level, leaving the LE the entry-level vehicle.

Modifications to the exterior design included fresh coats of paint, new wheels, and some minor tweaks. The new infotainment system has a 7- or 9-inch touchscreen display for the dashboard. However, only the 301-hp V-6 and eight-speed auto are offered with it. The sedan features a recalibrated suspension 0.6 inches lower than the standard vehicles in addition to its sportier body makeover, which includes a subtle rear spoiler and two noticeable exhaust points. Bigger front brake rotors and black 18-inch rims with all-season or summer tires are two further performance-improving improvements.

4. 2017 Toyota Camry

According to NHTSA data, the 2017 Camry is among the least troublesome models ever produced. The 2017 Camry didn’t undergo many changes in terms of features or aesthetics. Most of the significant redesign was completed for the 2015 model year, which features an entirely new exterior (apart from the roof panel), a more solid build, and improved infotainment options. In the group’s 2017 midsize car rankings, the Toyota Camry places extremely highly. It boasts a large cabin, excellent anticipated reliability, and high safety ratings, particularly for back passengers.

According to Co-Pilot Search (https://www.copilotsearch.com/posts/toyota-camry-years-to-avoid/), there are two engine options for the Camry: a conventional 2.5-liter four-cylinder with 178 horsepower or a 3.5-liter V-6 with 268 horsepower. Due to Toyota’s reliability, the average Camry may be driven for between two hundred and three hundred thousand miles before needing major repairs. The vehicle has a mileage of 21-24 in the city and 30-3 on the highway. Appraisal prices for a 2017 Toyota Camry can vary from $13,995 to $19,954.

3. 2013-2015 Toyota Camry

The Camry model years 2013-2015 appeared to have ironed out any remaining bugs. The vehicle received a flawless 5 out of 5 for dependability from various consumer publications. Customer satisfaction was high, and there were only two recalls. The air conditioner started emitting hot air after 100,000 miles, which is the only complaint. The 2013 model received an 84 in reliability from J.D. Power, whereas the 2014 model received a 92. Furthermore, the NHTSA has received minimal reports of problems with these vehicles.

Compared to the 370 complaints received by Toyota over the Camry in 2014, 2013 only received a little over 250. When put next to the Camry’s sales, that number is laughable. There are also several convenient extras already installed in these model years. Some examples are a keyless entry system, cruise control, a rearview camera, and several safety features. According to Engine Patrol (https://enginepatrol.com/toyota-camry-best-and-worst-years/), buying a used car might cost you a pretty penny, with the 2013 Camry costing roughly $11,000 and the 2014 model costing around $2,000 more.

2. 2005 Toyota Camry

One of the top used vehicles under $5,000 is the 2005 Camry. However, given the current state of used car prices, you might end up shelling out $8,000 or maybe even $10,000. The 2005 Toyota Camry possessed a redesigned grille, headlights, taillights, and wheel styles. In addition, antilock brakes were made standard on all Camrys, and a new five-speed automatic transmission is available as an option. The inside is well designed for the user, with easy-to-use and large controls for the climate, audio system, and supportive seats.

All Camrys’ interiors come standard with steering wheel audio controls, Optitron gauges, a center rear headrest, and premium seat materials. In addition, safety-enhancing electronic stability control is now standard on four- and six-cylinder vehicles. Even though it had minor flaws (minor transmission and exhaust difficulties), the 2005 Camry was a vast improvement over the previous models. Furthermore, Toyota has introduced a new base model of the Camry that is $1,000 cheaper than before.

1. 2004 Toyota Camry

It could be ideal if you’re willing to drive an older model Camry and can find one with low mileage and good condition for less than $5,000. But, true to form, it also received a perfect score of 5 in dependability and a passing grade of 4 in client happiness. And among all model years, it ranks at the bottom in complaints, despite being nearly two decades old. So the car is worth it if you are interested in one.

Overall, client satisfaction and ratings for dependability and ease of driving were all quite good for the 2004 Camry. The 2004 Camry continues to have a lot of life left within it if you acquire one with low mileage and care for it properly. According to Olive (https://olive.com/best-toyota-camry-year/), there is a possibility that a transmission replacement may be necessary for vehicles with over 100,000 kilometers. Still, after this is done, the vehicle will have a couple of extra years of useful life.

Worst Years for the Toyota Camry

Every good thing also has a bad side; the same goes for the Toyota Camry models. Unfortunately, the Camry has had some rough times with engine problems and recalls that caused significant hassles for both customers and manufacturers. As a result, the model possesses some of the worst years people should avoid when purchasing used Toyota Camry cars.

5. 2007 Toyota Camry

Simply put, the 2007 model year of the Toyota Camry should be avoided at all costs because it has the greatest number of faults. Problems with automatic transmission are consistently cited as one of the most serious complaints. The problem occurs when the transmission begins to lag when the driver is attempting to accelerate, which might cause it to heat up, and this means that drivers will need to replace it sooner than they would prefer. A malfunctioning check engine light, missed shifts, and troubles with the power steering are other faults associated with the Camry model year 2007.

Even while the objections are not particularly noteworthy in comparison to those regarding other models, it is nevertheless something that prospective purchasers ought to bear in mind. There were over 1,020 complaints lodged against the 2007 Camry at CarComplaints.com, while 3,703 problems were reported at CarProblemZoo.com.

4. 2008 and 2009 Toyota Camry

Both versions have a wide variety of issues, many of which are caused by flaws in the manufacturing process. Unfortunately, even models of vehicles that were not included in recall efforts encountered many severe problems, leading to several complaints from people who owned the cars. For example, the sun visor’s inability to remain in its raised position blocked the driver’s line of sight, which was a persistent and frustrating problem.

Despite fewer complaints, the 2008 and 2009 Camry underwent no significant changes. Many drivers encountered similar transmission problems and reported frustration with the check engine light. Most notably, the ignition coil would fail in 2008 models after accumulating 100,000 kilometers. The 2009 model also had a minor issue with sludge accumulation around the engine due to the use of natural oil.

3. 2003 Toyota Camry

The 2003 Toyota Camry was an attempt to improve the 2002 model; nevertheless, despite addressing some of the complaints against its predecessor, it was still largely unsuccessful. Aside from the persistent problem of stripped head bolts, the engine frequently died. When turned, the steering wheel knocked, and it was generally noisy. You do not want to drive a noisy car, which makes your drive irritating and boring. Consistent transmission problems, such as difficult gear shifting, gearbox failure, and acceleration lag, continued to frustrate customers and drive them away from Toyotas. When the head gasket in a Camry of this vintage fails, it can cause severe oil leaks. Signs include engine failure, white smoke from the exhaust pipe after the car has heated up, dirty coolant, and smoke from under the hood.

2. 2015 Toyota Camry

There is a price range of $12,545–$17,860 for the 2015 Toyota Camry, a medium sedan. That being said, spending such an amount of money on a car, you have to ensure that what you buy is worth it. A few nagging issues with the 2015 model year prevented it from being otherwise excellent. The interior was the primary source of discomfort, with poor seats, a poor display system with device connection problems, and a broken clock. In terms of driving excitement, entry-level cars fall well short. According to Torque News (https://www.torquenews.com/1083/shopping-used-toyota-camry-heres-year-and-color-avoid-all-costs), there are issues with the electric power steering motor. The vehicle might produce abnormal vibrations and a noticeable pull in one direction when attempting to steer. In addition, sometimes the transmission can be faulty and refuse to shift at appropriate times, leading to additional problems. Finally, a ride in this car can be uncomfortable. The ride is generally unpleasant, and the car’s design is a pain.

1. 2001 Toyota Camry

Among compact cars, the 2001 Toyota Camry was ranked third in reliability which isn’t terrible but is hardly what most people expect from a reasonably priced Toyota. Even if it wasn’t the absolute worst car, it was terrible for a budget vehicle. This rating was unfairly assigned. Furthermore, the vehicle has big and small engine problems, making it less fuel-efficient than it should be and adding to the price tag. It has suspension problems, rim problems, and paint that flaked off or rusted. The interior climate control system malfunctions many times and has brake problems. The 2001 Toyota Camry is one you should avoid with all means necessary as it is notoriously unreliable.

Conclusion

You can rejoice in the knowledge that the Toyota Camry models are a terrific fit if you’re looking for a newer used Camry. The majority of the Toyota models the company produces are high-quality, high-quality examples that are both long-lasting and highly effective. Reliability is a major selling point for Toyota, and the fact that models like the Camry from 2004 are still on the road today is proof of that. Of course, some models in the lineup are bothersome or horrible, like the 2007 Camry, but there are also many excellent options. The discussion above is evidence of this.

Pre-owned automobiles with an excellent reputation are the ones you should consider purchasing. That’s something you can say with the Camry; however, there are a few niggles that purchasers must be aware of. Vehicles with fewer than 50,000 miles on the odometer and a history of few accidents are the safest bet.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.