Why is Fiji Water So Expensive? Here’s the Answer

Water is one of the most valuable resources we have on earth. It’s also one of the most abundant, yet it’s become a profitable business over the last few decades. Water today is a commodity; and while the structure of water is the same no matter where you get it from, it’s very clear that not all waters are equal. Grocery stores and various other stores today are lined with rows upon rows of different kinds of water. You can find all sorts of water today—flavored, sparkling, flat, alkaline, distilled, spring, and so many others. However, there’s one water brand that seems to continuously occupy the ranks of the best bottled waters in the world, and that’s Fiji. It’s also important to note that the this well-known bottled water is also considered one of the most expensive bottled waters in the world. The question in most people’s minds at this point is probably asking why Fiji water is so expensive. There are a few reasons why Fiji is expensive, and the first one is all about logistics.

History

Fiji’s slogan states that those who drink the bottled water don’t even have to go to Fiji in order to enjoy it. There’s a dark story behind that statement because of the country’s political climate, but there’s also a simpler explanation. Fiji bottled water is only bottled from Fiji, so that means that there are export and import costs associated with buying and selling Fiji bottled water. The bottles from Fiji are shipped to the headquarters in Los Angeles. In America, Fiji is still the most imported bottled water. That certainly accounts for one reason why it’s expensive—the demand for water bottled from the mountain of Fiji is just great.

Next, Fiji is noticeably different form all other bottles of water out there. For one, the look is totally different. Most bottled waters come in normal shape; Fiji, on the other hand, has squared sides. In fact, production and packaging costs money for Fiji Water. Fiji Water owners Stewart and Lynda Resnick are very particular about the packaging of their product. Standing out makes sense in that particular industry because there are so many different kinds of bottle water sold in stores today. The packaging of Fiji water is extremely attractive and different from the rest. It can easily make a consumer’s eyes shift towards the direction of their bottles.

Aside from packaging, there’s also the fact that the water in Fiji water bottles are literally hard to come by. Because they come from Fiji and Fiji alone, it means that the water in those particular bottles is hard to get. The cost of obtaining the water is high because this particular water only comes from one place. According to this article, Fiji water is artesian water. This means that it comes from an artesian aquifer in one of the islands in Fiji. To understand this better, you need to know what an artesian aquifer is. An aquifer is essentially a naturally occurring filter. It’s a mineral-rich rock made out of limestone or sandstone or any other similar kind of rock. The water in Fiji bottles comes from rainfall that was collected even before the Industrial Revolution. That collected water sits in a pool untouched by nature’s elements because of the underground aquifer located in Fiji’s largest island, Viti Levu. That aquifer provides as both filter and protector for the water, which is an amazing natural occurrence.

Fiji is also classified as artesian water because of the natural filters that it goes through. The artesian description qualifies it to be a more “pure” form of water because it doesn’t go through any mechanical or industrial processes for purification. Fiji sells it as such, that untouched is the way nature intended for water to be had. Many fans of Fiji water also claims that the product does taste a lot purer when compared to other brands. While that may be so, water taste is still a subjective matter. What tastes good for one person may not be the same for another. However, many water snobs claim that Fiji water lacks the metallic taste that many industrialized water has.

All of that may be true, or they may also be hyped. Part of Fiji’s brilliant marketing technique is psychological. The aggressive pricing structure of Fiji water is strategic in nature. There’s a counterintuitive aspect to pricing a product higher than average. It makes consumers think that a product is priced higher because it is better. It’s similar to the pricing of wine in restaurants. Many restaurants will price a bottle higher because it actually doesn’t sell well and is still fully stocked. Most people believe that a costlier bottle of wine is better quality—therefore, it costs more—even though that may not be the case.

Final Thoughts

The same is true of water. Fiji water is priced higher with the idea that many people will buy it because they think the quality is higher. Even though this may not be the case, the marketing strategy has already been in place, and people are already buying into the notion. Whether Fiji water is hype or not when it comes to taste and quality, it’s no doubt that its purity is there. Whether people value purity or not is up to personal preference.

Fiji water will always be established as one of the best bottled waters in the industry, and that alone warrants a higher price in comparison to other. The question to ask now is whether the cost is worth the product. From what we’ve mentioned above, it may seem like it is worth it. Otherwise, the other option to try artesian aquifer water is to fly to Fiji yourself. You’d have to do all the work of obtaining water from a rock, or you could pay $5 for a bottle and be done with it.


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