Remembering the 1952 Adler M 250 S

1952 Adler M 250 S

There are six different types of motorcycles most commonly recognized by enthusiasts; cruiser, sport, touring, standard, dual-purpose, and dirt bike. When companies design motorcycles, they may fall under a combination of them. For example, many consider sports touring a seventh category. This isn’t to say that there are strict regulations governing the classification of motorcycles. It’s simply a way for companies to market their bicycles in the best possible way for the consumer to find the one that best suits them and the open road. One company, Adler designed a bike that fits comfortably into all these categories. Adler was in business from 1900 to 1957 and manufactured cars and motorcycles and typewriters and calculators. The name Adler means Eagle and it’s apropos for a company that makes such street-worthy vehicles. The company ceased production of vehicles after World War II and production of motorcycles ran for eight years until the company closed. After the devastation of the war, Adler’s motorcycle designs were given to the British as part of war reparations. Four years after the release of the 1952 Adler M 250S the company merged with another prominent motorcycle company; Triumph. Then, a year later it was taken over by Grundig in 1957 This was when this period the company focused primarily on typewriters and other office equipment. However, there is one bike that still stands out after all these years: the 1952 Adler M250 S.

Displacing The Competition

There are three portions of the motorcycle. First, there is the cylinder head which is at the top. Next, there is the cylinder itself which is where you’ll find the pistons. The last part of the motorcycle is the Crankcase and Gear Box. That’s where the crankshaft is located. When looking at these last two, the cylinder is in the crankcase, and the remaining space houses the gearbox. The displacement is how much the piston moves within the engine’s cylinder as the crankshaft moves. So, if an engine is a two-stroke it means it needs only two steps to reach power. This all ties into the RPM or rotations per minute which dictates how many times the crankshaft rotates in a minute. Thus, some models are faster overall. According to Ficha Motor, the Adler M 280 S has multiple engine displacements which makes it an all-terrain motorcycle. Thus, it fits into all the categories of motorcycles comfortably. It is the first model where this happened. And much like this site states, the sheer innovation of the bike is why people are talking about it years later. It has a 2-cylinder, 2-stroke engine with a kick start and a displacement of 247.00 ccs (15.07 ci) and a total power of 16.00 hp(11.7 kW) @ 5590 rpm. It can top speeds of 116 MPH.

Some of the other specifications that potential buyers may want to know to include the Bore X Stroke which is 54.0 x 54.0mm or 2.1 x 2.1 inches. It has a carburetor intake and is air-cooled. There are four separate gears on the transmission. When looking at the Gearbox you will see four speeds with a neutral indicator. The gearshift lever rests on the left side of the engine. The fuel tank is rubber-mounted with 12 liters and a 2-liter reserve. The oil capacity is 1.2 liters. The overall weight of the bike is 135kg for the 1952 model. The maximum all-up weight is 295kg without a sidecar and 420kg with one. The frame is a double-cradle steel tube with attachment points if you want to add the sidecar. The 1952 Adler M 250S has a leading link with integral damping front suspension. For the rear suspension, it is telescopic hydraulic spring dampers. You’ll also find a 6 volt, 60-watt dynamo voltage regulated system. Some additional pluses on the bike include a steering lock and a lockable toolbox. Additionally, there is an adjustable steering damper with an enclosed rear chain and folding rear guard. There are twin mufflers with lower pipes.

An Adler Story

Thumbing through the history of Adler, I stumbled on the tale of Phil Speakman who published a tale about his quest for parts for classic motorcycles. One of his favorites is the 1952 Adler M 250 S. And, judging from everything I read, it’s not an easy task to locate them. As he tells it, he was in the Ardennes Forest in Belgium during the winter months which get extremely cold. His end destination is somewhere where he can meet with a person who knows these impressive bikes inside and out; Rolf Bungert. As he continues his story, he talks about a room full of motorcycles both ready to ride as well as to sell for parts. He equates it to another classic motorcycle rebuild project he did on another well-known bike, The Indian. Throughout the article, his exclamations are that of a young child on Christmas Morning.

Setting The Standard

Dan Aykroyd once said, “you do not need a therapist if you own a motorcycle, any kind of motorcycle.” If you own a 1952 Adler M 250s you have one of the best on the market. The company changed hands many times and went through several evolutions that eventually ended with office equipment. However, Adler’s 1952 M250 started the trend of modern twin-cylinder 2-stroke motorcycles similar to the Yamaha RD series. Additionally, the overall appearance of the motorcycle was so forward thing you’d see something similar on bikes from Ariel and Suzuki. Before learning about Adler, I was skeptical about motorcycles and never had too much of an inclination to purchase one. However, the classic lines of yesteryear and the overall performance may of the 1952 Adler M 250S just change my mind. They have a storied history and a reputation for amazing performance. Maybe then I will understand what Dan Aykroyd was talking about.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.