The Official Floyd Mayweather Net Worth Is $560 Million – Here’s How He Made His Money

Floyd Mayweather

When it comes to the boxing world, it is almost impossible to hold a conversation about the history of the sport without the name Floyd Mayweather popping up. Floyd officially retired in 2016 with a 50-0 record — finishing his career with an unblemished record. He would come out of retirement to fight with MMA fighter Conor McGregor in 2017 — a fight that netted him $275 million. Yes, he earned a whopping $275 million for one fight. When you understand Floyd’s genius in promoting and business, you will start to understand how he leveraged technology and the boxing game to build a nice financial empire.

Early Life Of Floyd Mayweather

Floyd Mayweather jr was birthed into a perfect storm, born into a family where his father and uncle were successful boxers in their own right. He also graduated into the pro ranks around the time that pay for view television was taking off. The combination of pay-per-view and Floyd managing and promoting himself, he was able to pocket much of the money that would have otherwise gone to promoters. The boxing game is full of boxers who were hits at the box office but retired broke because greedy promoters were sucking up the money.

How Professional Boxing Contributed To His Wealth

Floyd has a net worth of nearly $600 million, $560 to be exact. It all makes sense when you understand that his career earnings are estimated to have eclipsed the $1 billion mark. The only other athletes to have earned more than $1 billion are Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods. Both of these athletes have earned approximately $1.5 billion over the course of their career.

It is likely that the Connor McGregor fight is what put Floyd over the $1 Billion mark. There are some who believe that Floyd will make yet another comeback. With his legacy in Boxing already etched, most people can’t understand why he would risk it. The McGregor fight netted a total of over $400 million and Mayweather pocketed over $275 million of that. It is the shrewd manner in which Mayweather does business outside of the ring that has allowed him to keep so much of his purses, especially toward the end of his career.

While Mayweather obviously had other business endeavors outside of the ring, the vast majority of his net worth was earned with his fists. What surprises most people is that the fighter has been able to hold on to much with such a lavish lifestyle and loose spending habits. What is likely is that Mayweather’s spending habits are not as foolish as many are led to believe. He appears to be very smart with his money although he flaunts it a lot.

The $275 million split with McGregor was not the only time that Mayweather pocketed nine figures after a fight. In his 2015 fight with Manny Pacquiao, he made a whopping $250 million. Additionally, there are at least eight other fights in which he made a minimum of $40 million. Again, this guy knew how to promote himself and set himself up for the biggest paydays possible.

All things considered, Floyd Mayweather will go done as one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the history of the sport. He has never lost a professional bout, and he has eclipsed the hallowed mark of 49-0 held by Rocky Marciano. In a sport in which the competition looks to be improving after a long lull, it is likely that no one will threaten his perfect record any time soon. With Floyd still very young, there are numerous opportunities for him to use his financial resources to make his presence felt in other industries. At one point he was feeling out the music industry but it is not clear if he will take it seriously enough to make an imprint.

With all of the money that Mayweather made on the McGregor fight, there is a lot of talk about a rematch. It is not clear if a rematch would be the draw that the first fight was. There were a lot of people who gave McGregor a chance, but it was obvious in that first fight that he was outmatched as a boxer. Now if McGregor could lure Mayweather into the octagon, it could an entirely different outcome. Personally, I don’t see Floyd being stupid enough to climb into an octagon with a seasoned MMA fighter with MMA rules.


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